Equip your church,
anytime, anywhere.
Get Started
Resurrection Morning: A Thrill of Hope

Resurrection Morning: A Thrill of Hope

4.14.2022
4
MIN
Scripture
Share

You can’t have Easter without Christmas. The birth of our savior and his resurrection are inextricably linked.

Jesus’s resurrection, as “O Holy Night” says, is the breaking of a “new and glorious morn.” That hymn, in fact, bears great significance for us this Easter season. In its first few lines, we find incredible hope:

“O holy night, the stars are brightly shining

It is the night of our dear savior’s birth.

Long lay the world in sin and error pining,

Till he appeared and the soul felt its worth. 

The thrill of hope, the weary world rejoices,

For yonder breaks a new and glorious morn.”

Jesus’s birth held the promise of a new hope for those who were there to see it. Joseph and Mary and the shepherds were certain of the significance of the child laying in that borrowed feeding trough (Luke 2:7). The “Savior . . . who is the Messiah, the Lord” was “born for [them]” (Luke 2:11, CSB). 

Thirty-three years later, the “new and glorious morn” was replaced with hopeless mourning. Jesus’s lifeless, broken body was being placed in a borrowed tomb, and the holiness of that first night was being called into question. The stars that shined so “brightly” at his coming were now dimmed with his apparent departure. The joy of the weary world gave way to deep, guttural groans of lament.

From Garden to Graveyard

In the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve chose to pluck a fruit that they weren’t yet allowed to harvest, and the thorny consequences of that first sin affect us to this day. With one ill-advised bite, the garden became a graveyard that spread death around the globe.

 

In John’s gospel, we first meet the resurrected Jesus in a graveyard outside the tomb he had once occupied. Mary, soaking the ground outside the tomb with her tears, hears the voice of someone behind her, presuming him to be the gardener. 

 

What’s a gardener doing in a graveyard before sunrise?

Mary’s assumption about the man in the garden, who we know is Jesus, points us to a deeper truth. Jesus, beginning with his death and resurrection, is turning a graveyard into a garden, undoing the curse of sin. He is inaugurating and cultivating the new creation. He is resurrecting this death-soaked world.

The world now has a reason to rejoice.

Hope Restored

We celebrate Easter because at the resurrection of Jesus—the new and better gardener—the world is in bloom again. We wear bright colors, sing resurrection hymns, and feast with family and friends because we carry with us the thrill of hope, for “He is risen! He is risen, indeed!”

 

We couldn’t sing “O Holy Night” without the empty tomb of resurrection morning. The “night of our dear savior’s birth,” would be like any other night if not for the thrilling refrain: “He is risen! He is risen, indeed!”

So, rejoice weary world! For the “new and glorious morn” has come. The world is alive again. 

Journey with Jesus

If you’re interested in learning more about the life of Jesus of Nazareth and the impact of his ministry, check out Journey with Jesus with Dr. Tony Evans, Chrystal Evans Hurst, and Priscilla Shirer.

This is some text inside of a div block.
Jordan Wootten

Writer/Content Editor

Equip your church, anytime, anywhere with RightNow Media.

If you’re a decision-maker at your organization, request a free consultation to find out how RightNow Media can equip and inspire your people.

Not a decision-maker?
Tell your pastor about RightNow Media instead.

Submit
You're in!
Look out for a confirmation email shortly.
Oops! Something went wrong. Please refresh the page.

Equip your church, anytime, anywhere with RightNow Media.

Learn More