Pastor, It's Time to Join a Small Group

Page 1


The thought of joining a group for the first time might leave you feeling a little nervous. This parody of an instructional video illustrates that we all can seem a little weird to each other in our small groups. If you're friendly and accepting, you really can fit in at almost any small group!



Chances are good that you already had a hunch that it would be a good idea to avoid the types of behavior shown in that video. But as a pastor considering stepping into group life, you might still have some real reservations. In this post, Bill Search will hopefully remove those reservations, giving four compelling reasons why every pastor should be in a small group. Bill is Senior Pastor of Rolling Hills Christian Church in El Dorado Hills, California and author of Simple Small Groups.


How do you think your congregation would respond to a full endorsement of the small group ministry at your church, where you are able to personally testify to how group life has impacted your life? How is that personal testimony more impactful than just your endorsement?
Log In to Continue

What are the fears/apprehensions you have about joining a group?
Log In to Continue

As a pastor, much of your life—from what you are struggling with to the things you are rejoicing over—are tied to church business. What do you think it looks like to let small group members minister to the things your struggling with while keeping confidential church matters that they don't need to know about?
Log In to Continue

What would you most like to learn about your church through membership in a small group?
Log In to Continue

How do you think your spouse and/or children would respond to group life? What would you hope that a small group would give them?
Log In to Continue


No matter which way you look at it, you owe it to your church, your family, and really yourself to seriously consider joining a small group. While the benefits for church buy-in to small groups can be valuable, of even more value is the opportunity to be loved and cared for by a group—and not just you, your family too.