Give Your Family a Purpose and a Plan

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Being a parent is hard work! With all of the obligations of supporting and raising a family, sometimes it is easy to slip into maintenance mode, failing to be purposeful in the direction your family is heading. Watch as Tricia Goyer shares how identifying goals and making a plan to achieve those goals transformed her family. Tricia is a mother and grandmother who has written over thirty-five books, including works on marriage and parenting and many fiction novels. 


Tricia described an afternoon where she reached a point of desperation, completely overwhelmed with the task of being a parent. Can you relate to her situation? How do moments of desperation help bring clarity to your purpose and priorities?
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As they were defining purpose and priorities for their family, Tricia and her husband identified three main goals that they had for their children:
  • Love God and serve Him
  • Love each other as siblings
  • Become lifelong learners

List the three or four main goals that you have for your children and your family. If you've never thought about this before, when can you make time to sit down with your spouse and think/pray through some family goals?
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In order to achieve family goals, the Goyers developed a family plan. They made it a priority to do a few things consistently:
  • Get involved in church service together
  • Eat dinner as a family
  • Read together as a family


Think about the goals you've set for your family. What action steps do you need to take to begin a path toward fulfilling those goals?
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Starting new habits can be difficult in the beginning. How can you keep yourself and your family committed to your new family plan, even when it is hard?
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It is so easy to fall into a pattern of just getting through the day. Without intentionality about your family's purpose and priorities, days can turn into weeks, which turn into years, with no progress towards achieving goals.  As Tricia encouraged, always ask yourself, "where do I need to go?" and "what do I need to do to get there?"