Working Together for the Faith of Our Kids

Multiple Sources of Discipleship


Passing faith to the next generation of brothers and sisters in Christ is a monumental responsibility. While God has placed the majority of this responsibility on parents, the weight is shared by the larger community of faith. In the first video, Larry Fowler, author and Executive Director for Global Training for Awana, builds from the example of Timothy to show the importance of multiple sources of influence in discipling children.


Larry cited the example of Timothy to show the impact of multiple spheres of discipleship operating in Timothy's life—from his family and from Paul. Think about the way discipleship of children is approached in your church. Are there multiple sources? What are they?
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Have you noticed an emphasis on discipleship in the church (children's ministry) over discipleship at home, or vice versa? If so, do you agree with that emphasis? Why or why not?
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What are some unique ways that kids are discipled through a ministry of the church that parents are not necessarily able to provide? What are some ways that parents can disciple their children that a ministry at church cannot do?
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Parents, how can you be strategic about reinforcing faith lessons that your kids are learning at church? Children's workers, how can you be strategic about reinforcing faith lessons that children are learning at home?
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A Unified Objective


Rarely do parents and children's ministries find themselves directly opposing one another. However, often results are diminished because they aren't on the same page. Watch as Larry shares how to unite children's ministry workers and parents under the same goal, helping them work together to disciple the next generation.



Larry pointed out that he has observed that typically children's ministry workers are intentional about spiritual development of kids, while parents are hopeful about it. He noted, "there is a huge gap between being hopeful and intentional."

Children's workers, have you experienced parents who are more hopeful about their child's spiritual development than they are intentional? If so, what frustrations have you experienced as a result? If not, what encourages you about parents who are intentional concerning their kid's spiritual formation?
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Parents, how do you feel about Larry's observation? Would you characterize yourself as more hopeful than intentional about your kid's spiritual development? In what ways are you intentional about discipling your kids?
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Children's workers, take a moment and list out goals that you have for the kids in your ministry. What opportunities do you have to communicate these goals to parents?
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Parents, list the goals that you have for the spiritual development of your child. How can you make sure to communicate these goals to those who oversee the spiritual development of your child at church?
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How can parents and children's ministry workers more effectively communicate about spiritual development of children at your church? What can you do to help make that happen?
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While children's ministry workers and parents may come at the task from different angles, both can agree on the importance of instilling a lifelong faith in children. Whether you are a parent or involved in children's ministry, God has entrusted you with a vital role. Actively seek opportunities to get on the same page, aligning goals and objectives in ministering to the next generation.