Lean on God's Hope

2014 Peace of Mind Conference


When mental illness strikes a family, darkness and defeat can settle in. Where can the mentally ill and their loved ones turn? In this 8-minute message from the 2014 Peace of Mind mental health conference, Bishop Joseph E. Strickland urges the mentally ill and their families to rest in the peace of God's presence.

 

Bishop Strickland lost his older brother, Michael, to mental illness in 1977. He attended Holy Trinity Seminary, was ordained to the priesthood in 1985, and chosen by Pope Benedict VXI to be the Fourth Bishop of the Diocese of Tyler in 2012. 



Bishop Strickland’s brother was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia before there were very many public conversations going on about mental illness. How far do you think we’ve come in talking about mental illness? How much farther do you think we have to go?
Log In to Continue

Mental illness affects everyone in the family. Have you been affected by mental illness in your family or know someone who has been? How is the family affected?
Log In to Continue

Bishop Strickland said that Michael was the most intelligent of all his siblings. Often very talented and gifted people are the ones who suffer mental illness. Does that at all challenge how you think about mental health victims? If so, in what ways?
Log In to Continue

Bishop Strickland described the struggle with mental illness as a “scary, difficult roller coaster ride” that ended in death. His brother was stuck in a cycle of taking his medications and getting better and then getting off of them and feeling worse. Were you familiar with this particular aspect of mental illness? What is your experience with the ups-and-downs of medication to help with mental illness?
Log In to Continue

Bishop Strickland said that the Lord uses difficulties like mental illness to bring goodness, hope, and healing to families and ministries. Share a moment of "light" you or your family has experienced in the midst of darkness.
Log In to Continue

Bishop Strickland said, “There is always hope because the Lord is with us.” How does this kind of faith sustain or inspire you and your family as you struggle with mental illness?
Log In to Continue


Sadly, mental illness isn’t something a person can will himself out of or “fix.” It is a constant struggle that affects victims and families for a lifetime. Our only hope is to rely on God’s constant presence with us. As we extend care to our loved ones who suffer, we live that hope and share it with them.


For more information on the Peace of Mind Conference, visit peaceofmindtyler.com.